Ogre Canyon

Our trek to Ogre Canyon was quite an adventure.  From acquiring a canine tour guide to finding out that everyone else just drives the six kilometers in, we had some unforeseen encounters; however, we lucked out on getting a ride back out from the man who thought we stole his dog.

Ogre Canyon is near Brule, Alberta (about 8 km away down a bumpy trail).  There is an imposing rock face with a deep cleft.

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The Ogre can be seen in the cliffs near the top of the great crack.  The upper falls will line up to appear to be spouting out of his mouth.  That day the Ogre was just checking out the falls.  Or drooling heavily.

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The convoluted canyon and the lowest of three falls are accessible without climbing.  To enter further requires a bit of scrambling and wet shoes.  The Ogre is difficult to see from the right side of the notch.  There are other strange faces up there with him.

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The current internet craze is to post pictures of scenic places with hard to see people in them.  Can you see the man in this photo?  If so, you can better make out the scale of this canyon.  You might see an angry dog in the rock formations as well.

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The middle falls are reached after passing through a narrow corridor within the canyon notch.  A canyon within a canyon.  It isn’t a long drop for the water but it produces enough spray to make photography difficult.

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The trail continues from the left side of the canyon up the ridge to the top of the falls, but we didn’t carry on.  That was fortunate, as it turned out, because someone was looking for our guide dog.

He was a good guide; to all appearances a practiced hand with knowledge of every side trail, mud puddle and potential picnic spot along the way.  He stuck with us despite our every effort to make him turn back or help other people.  He worked for nothing but the pleasure of a good walk and companionship.  In other words, he knew exactly what he was doing.

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He got us that ride back to town, too.